The Queen is fond of quoting the saying of Schopenhauer, "If it were not for the honest faces of dogs, we should forget the very existence of sincerity"; and from her childhood to the present time she has always had dogs about her.

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Her earliest favourite, "Dash," a black-and-tan spaniel, was her constant companion when, as the Princess Victoria, she took her morning walk in Kensington Gardens, and his joyous bark was the first welcome she received on her return to Buckingham Palace from her coronation. "Looty," a lovely silken, long-haired dog brought by a British officer from China, was a later favourite. When the Summer Palace at Peking was burning, this little dog was discovered curled up amongst soft shawls and rugs in one of the wardrobes, and the officer who rescued him and brought him to England as a present to the Queen gave him the significant name of "Looty." A picture of him by Mr. Friedrich Wilhelm Keyl was exhibited in the Royal Academy many years ago.

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NobleNoble
Her Majesty has a special fondness for collies, and among these faithful animals were for many years chief favourites, and always travelled with her to and from Balmoral. " 'Noble,' "she writes in her diary, "is the most biddable dog I ever saw. He will hold a piece of cake in his mouth without eating it, until he may. If he thinks we are not pleased with him, he puts out his paws and begs in such an affectionate way." A beautiful collie named "Darnley II." has been for many years Her Majesty's chief pet. He has a special" cottage " of his own, apart from the kennels of the other dogs. In their beautiful homes in the grounds of Windsor Castle are to be seen skyes, collies, pugs, and dachs, in great variety; but the Queen's particular pride are her Italian "Spitzes," a breed of beautiful buff-coloured dogs which she was the first to introduce into this country. with his lovely white coat and almost human intelligence, is another chief favourite with his royal mistress. It would be a mistake to suppose that these pets are unduly pampered, for the Queen believes that plain living induces high thinking in dogs as well as in human beings.
MarcoMarco

Her Majesty has been one of the most accomplished horse-women of her time, and her ponies have an almost equal share of attention with her dogs. There is Jessie, which was her favourite riding mare for twenty-five years, and carried her through many a Highland expedition; then there are her two Shetland ponies, and "Flora" and "Alma," presented by King Victor Emmanuel, and a grey Arab, a present from the Thakore of Morvi. The royal mews at Windsor cover an extent of four acres, and have accommodation for one hundred horses. The harness-horses are nearly all of them grey, and those for the broughams are dark chestnut. But specially proud is the Queen of her twelve cream-coloured horses, which I have been privileged to see in the mews at Buckingham Palace, looking very beautiful indeed with their long, silky tails nearly touching the ground. Their ancestors took the girl Queen, nearly sixty years ago, to her coronation, and the stock is always kept up for Her Majesty's use on State occasions.

An amusing little favourite of the Queen was "Picco," which she used to drive in a pony-carriage some years ago. He was a Sardinian pony, presented by the King of that country, and was only forty-four inches high. That charming naturalist Frank Buckland has given an amusing account of his attempts to sketch this fussy, nervous little fellow, who was highly indignant at having his measurements taken. The Queen was greatly diverted by the account of her pet's behaviour, for she is fond of studying the characters of the animals about her, and likes them to have their pictures taken. Bushey Park is used as a kind of home of rest for the pet horses who are no longer fit for active service. There "Picco" was sent to end his days, and, as a useful lesson in humility, he had "Alderney," a costermonger's rescued victim, given him for a companion. One day, when the Queen was driving in the Isle of Wight, she saw a costermonger savagely beating a beautiful white pony, and, stopping her carriage, she offered to buy the ill-used animal, in order to save him from his life of misery. She gave him the name of "Alderney," and promoted him to a life of ease in Bushey Park, where he doubtless entertained his aristocratic friend "Picco" with the doings of costerland.

To-day the Queen's chief favourite is Jacquot, the strong, handsome donkey with the white nose and knotted tail, which draws her chair in the gardens of Frogmore or through the shady glades at Osborne, and has accompanied Her Majesty to the Highlands and to Florence and the Riviera.

But the Queen had plenty of live-stock too. From an account in the Idler of the Queen's pet animals, we learn that they consist almost entirely of dogs, horses, and donkeys. The following is a list of some of the royal pets: Flora and Alma, two horses fourteen hands high, presented to the Queen by Victor Emmanuel. Jenny, a white donkey, twenty-five years of age, which has been with the Queen since it was a foal. Tewfik, a white Egyptian ass, bought in Cairo by Lord Wolseley. Two Shetland ponies -- one, The Skewbald, three feet six inches high; another, a dark brown mare like a miniature cart-horse. The royal herd of fifty cows in milk, chiefly shorthorns and Jerseys. An enormous bison named Jack, obtained in exchange for a Canadian bison from the Zoological Gardens. A cream-coloured pony called Sanger, presented to the Queen by the circus proprietor. A Zulu cow bred from the herd of Cetewayo's brother. A strong handsome donkey called Jacquot, with a white nose and knotted tail. This donkey draws the Queen's chair (a little four-wheeled carriage with rubber tyres and a low step), and has accompanied her to Florence. A gray donkey, the son of the Egyptian Tewfik, carries the Queen's grandchildren. Jessie, the Queen's favourite riding mare, which is twenty-seven years old. A gray Arab, presented to Her Majesty by the Thakore of Morvi. The stables contain eighteen harness horses, most of them gray, and twelve brougham horses ranging from dark brown to light chestnut. Four brown ponies, fourteen hands high, bred from a pony called Beatrice, which Princess Beatrice used to ride. The Royal Mews cover an extent of four acres, and accommodate as many as one hundred horses. The carriage-house contains the post-chaise in which the Queen and the Prince-Consort travelled through Germany seven years after their marriage. The carriages of the household weigh about 15 cwt. each. The royal kennels contain fifty-five dogs.

The Personal Life of Queen Victoria, By Sarah A. Tooley. Third Edition, London, Hodder and Stoughton, 27, Paternoster Row, 1901. Printed by Hasell Watson 6- Vinry, Ld, London and Aylesbury.
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"Victoria! writ large in lines of light,
The name through coming ages will remain
In foremost rank with those great few that blight
Ne'er tarnished, shining on without a stain."

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Queen, Age 11

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Puffy, Pug
Italian Spitz

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Gina & Beppo

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Marco

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Sharp

Sharp

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Turi, Pomeranian

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Queen, Aldershot
1856

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Queen of Trumps c.1845

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Queen 1845
Arabian Horses

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Queen's Riding School

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Queen & John Brown

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Queen Osborne Gates
15-Jan-1901

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The Skewbald

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The Skewbald

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Tewfik

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Sanger

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Ninette, White Donkey

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Jacquot

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Jacquot

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Jenny

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Jenny

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Jessie

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Char-A-Banc

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The Grey Arab

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Kennels, Swinley

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Queen's Stables

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Jack the Buffalo


# Queen Victoria Site Map